Search Humans NU

Home Page

Support Humans NU

Table of Contents

Exit Humans NU

Introduce Yourself


Copyright © 1997, Jay Ligda.  All rights reserved.  Published by Humans in the Universe and Jay Ligda.

Morphogenetic Fields

      The theory of morphogenetic fields is Sheldrake's "alternative to the mechanistic world-view" (1991, p. 202).  A morphogenetic field is a "collective memory" of a given species (Sheldrake, 1991).  Each species has its own field that affects the intellect of the individuals of the species.  Sheldrake (1991) even extends the ideas of fields to atoms, molecules and even "laws" of nature.

      Evidence for this is supplied by an experiment started at Harvard University.  Over a ten year period, rats were trained to escape from a water maze.  Each new generation learned to escape quicker.  After ten years, the rats could escape ten times faster than the original rats.  This change occurred in all of the rats of the same species and not just the descendants of the original rats.  In fact, the change occurred in rats of the same species in other areas of the world (Sheldrake, 1991).

      More empirical evidence for morphogenetic fields comes from the blue tit, a European bird (Sheldrake, 1991).  The blue tits learned that they could steal cream from the top of milk bottles left on the doorsteps of houses.  Eventually birds all over Europe were stealing cream.  When the WWII came, milk was no longer delivered in Holland.  After eight years, when the war ended, the milk delivery continued.  The blue tits, in a short period of time, were once again stealing the cream.  The amazing thing is that the life span of the blue tit is only three years.  Two generations of blue tits had passed and yet the descendants still knew how to steal cream (Sheldrake, 1991).

      The proof of morphogenetic fields is further supported by the fact that in two different places of the world, the theory of evolution was independently discovered by both Darwin and Wallace; and, in two different places of the world, calculus was independently invented by both Newton and Leibniz.

by Jay Ligda

(This work is a all or part of an original work first published/written for John. F. Kennedy University:  Final Integrative Project., Mar1996.)


DOWN <-- --> TOP
(Forward and backward navigation buttons only work on 4.0 browsers)

References

  • Sheldrake, R.  (1991).  "The Past in Present."  Ch.10 in M. Toms (Ed.)  At the Leading Edge.  pp. 202 - 218.  Burdett, NY: Published for Paul Brunton Philosophic Foundation.

MAIL

E-mail Comments and Suggestions


Search Humans NU

Home Page

Support Humans NU

Table of Contents

Exit Humans NU

Introduce Yourself